Tuition Rising

Tuition Rising
Author: Ronald G. Ehrenberg
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Total Pages: 333
Release: 2009-07-01
Genre: Education
ISBN: 0674034430

America’s colleges and universities are the best in the world. They are also the most expensive. Tuition has risen faster than the rate of inflation for the past thirty years. There is no indication that this trend will abate. Ronald G. Ehrenberg explores the causes of this tuition inflation, drawing on his many years as a teacher and researcher of the economics of higher education and as a senior administrator at Cornell University. Using incidents and examples from his own experience, he discusses a wide range of topics including endowment policies, admissions and financial aid policies, the funding of research, tenure and the end of mandatory retirement, information technology, libraries and distance learning, student housing, and intercollegiate athletics. He shows that colleges and universities, having multiple, relatively independent constituencies, suffer from ineffective central control of their costs. And in a fascinating analysis of their response to the ratings published by magazines such as U.S. News & World Report, he shows how they engage in a dysfunctional competition for students. In the short run, colleges and universities have little need to worry about rising tuitions, since the number of qualified students applying for entrance is rising even faster. But in the long run, it is not at all clear that the increases can be sustained. Ehrenberg concludes by proposing a set of policies to slow the institutions’ rising tuitions without damaging their quality.

Why Does College Cost So Much?

Why Does College Cost So Much?
Author: Robert B. Archibald
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 302
Release: 2011
Genre: Business & Economics
ISBN: 0190214104

College tuition has risen more rapidly than the overall inflation rate for much of the past century. To explain rising college cost, the authors place the higher education industry firmly within the larger economic history of the United States.

Going Broke by Degree

Going Broke by Degree
Author: Richard K. Vedder
Publisher: American Enterprise Institute
Total Pages: 296
Release: 2004
Genre: Business & Economics
ISBN: 9780844741970

Economist Richard Vedder examines the causes of the college tuition crisis and explores ways to reverse this alarming trend.

Paying the Price

Paying the Price
Author: Sara Goldrick-Rab
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 382
Release: 2016-09-01
Genre: Education
ISBN: 022640448X

A “bracing and well-argued” study of America’s college debt crisis—“necessary reading for anyone concerned about the fate of American higher education” (Kirkus). College is far too expensive for many people today, and the confusing mix of federal, state, institutional, and private financial aid leaves countless students without the resources they need to pay for it. In Paying the Price, education scholar Sara Goldrick-Rab reveals the devastating effect of these shortfalls. Goldrick-Rab examines a study of 3,000 students who used the support of federal aid and Pell Grants to enroll in public colleges and universities in Wisconsin in 2008. Half the students in the study left college without a degree, while less than 20 percent finished within five years. The cause of their problems, time and again, was lack of money. Unable to afford tuition, books, and living expenses, they worked too many hours at outside jobs, dropped classes, took time off to save money, and even went without adequate food or housing. In many heartbreaking cases, they simply left school—not with a degree, but with crippling debt. Goldrick-Rab combines that data with devastating stories of six individual students, whose struggles make clear the human and financial costs of our convoluted financial aid policies. In the final section of the book, Goldrick-Rab offers a range of possible solutions, from technical improvements to the financial aid application process, to a bold, public sector–focused “first degree free” program. "Honestly one of the most exciting books I've read, because [Goldrick-Rab has] solutions. It's a manual that I'd recommend to anyone out there, if you're a parent, if you're a teacher, if you're a student."—Trevor Noah, The Daily Show

Why Public Higher Education Should Be Free

Why Public Higher Education Should Be Free
Author: Robert Samuels
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
Total Pages: 193
Release: 2013-08-15
Genre: Education
ISBN: 0813561256

Universities tend to be judged by the test scores of their incoming students and not on what students actually learn once they attend these institutions. While shared tests and surveys have been developed, most schools refuse to publish the results. Instead, they allow such publications as U.S. News & World Report to define educational quality. In order to raise their status in these rankings, institutions pour money into new facilities and extracurricular activities while underfunding their educational programs. In Why Public Higher Education Should Be Free, Robert Samuels argues that many institutions of higher education squander funds and mislead the public about such things as average class size, faculty-to-student ratios, number of faculty with PhDs, and other indicators of educational quality. Parents and students seem to have little knowledge of how colleges and universities have been restructured over the past thirty years. Samuels shows how research universities have begun to function as giant investment banks or hedge funds that spend money on athletics and administration while increasing tuition costs and actually lowering the quality of undergraduate education. In order to fight higher costs and lower quality, Samuels suggests, universities must reallocate these misused funds and concentrate on their core mission of instruction and related research. Throughout the book, Samuels argues that the future of our economy and democracy rests on our ability to train students to be thoughtful participants in the production and analysis of knowledge. If leading universities serve only to grant credentials and prestige, our society will suffer irrevocable harm. Presenting the problem of how universities make and spend money, Samuels provides solutions to make these important institutions less expensive and more vital. By using current resources in a more effective manner, we could even, he contends, make all public higher education free.

Higher Education Governance in East Asia

Higher Education Governance in East Asia
Author: Jung Cheol Shin
Publisher: Springer
Total Pages: 285
Release: 2018-10-01
Genre: Education
ISBN: 9811324697

This book deepens our understanding of how higher education governance has recently changed in the rapidly developing higher education systems of East Asia. Focusing on China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia and Taiwan, it explains the implications of how state-centered political systems interpret political and economic environments such as neoliberalism, as well as how each system is coping with global pressures. The book makes a valuable contribution to organization studies in higher education by investigating and detailing how individual higher education institutions are responding to their new environments.

A Problem of Fit

A Problem of Fit
Author: Phillip B. Levine
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 201
Release: 2022-04-22
Genre: Business & Economics
ISBN: 0226818551

"A college education doesn't come with a sticker price. Maybe it should. Millions of Americans miss out on the economic benefits of a college education because of concerns around the costs. Financial aid systems offer limited help and produce uneven distributions. In the United States today, the systems meant to improve access to education have added a new layer of deterrence. In Mismatch, economist Philip B. Levine examines the role of financial aid systems in facilitating (and discouraging) access to college. If markets require prices in order to function optimally, then the American higher-education system--rife as it is with hidden and variable costs--amounts to a market failure. It's a problem of price transparency, not just affordability. Ensuring that students understand exactly what college will cost, including financial aid, could lift the lid on not only college attendance for more people, but for greater representation across demographics and institutions. As Levine illustrates, our conversations around affordability and free tuition miss a larger truth: that the opacity of our current college-financing systems is a primary driver of inequities in education and society. Mismatch offers a bold, trenchant new argument for an educational reform that is well within reach"--

The Future of the Post-Massified University at the Crossroads

The Future of the Post-Massified University at the Crossroads
Author: Jung Cheol Shin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
Total Pages: 257
Release: 2013-11-22
Genre: Education
ISBN: 3319015230

The modern university started as an innovative model - a research-driven teaching and service model in the 19th century -, but the contemporary university is in a crisis of identity. The major challenge is how to harmonize different missions, e.g., teaching, research, and service. The triple function has become questionable and research now dominates the other two functions in contemporary higher education. This book takes a step towards further academic and policy discussions on the restructuring the triple functions of university and designing the future of the post-massified university.

Governing Academia

Governing Academia
Author: Ronald G. Ehrenberg
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Total Pages: 337
Release: 2016-10-01
Genre: Education
ISBN: 1501704753

Public concern over sharp increases in undergraduate tuition has led many to question why colleges and universities cannot behave more like businesses and cut their costs to hold tuition down. Ronald G. Ehrenberg and his coauthors assert that understanding how academic institutions are governed provides part of the answer. Factors that influence the governance of academic institutions include how states regulate higher education and govern their public institutions; the size and method of selection of boards of trustees; the roles of trustees, administrators, and faculty in shared governance at campuses; how universities are organized for fiscal and academic purposes; the presence or absence of collective bargaining for faculty, staff, and graduate student assistants; pressures from government regulations, donors, insurance carriers, athletic conferences, and accreditation agencies; and competition from for-profit providers. Governing Academia, which covers all these aspects of governance, is enlightening and accessible for anyone interested in higher education. The authors are leading academic administrators and scholars from a wide range of fields including economics, education, law, political science, and public policy.